Fascinasians: My Termination from the OCA Summer Internship Program

fascinasians:

When I was first notified of my acceptance to the OCA Summer Internship Program, I screamed. I was excited, happy, and anxious to start what I saw as a circle completing itself in my journey as an Asian American activist. In 2011, I registered for the OCA National Convention on a whim after…

when I, as an Asian American, say something like “i found something can relate to,” that doesn’t mean I’m closed minded, making it all about me, or that i only enjoy things that remind me of myself. on the contrary, being Asian American means i’m so used to everything *not* being about me, *not* reflecting me, that i don’t ever expect to see anything that’s a close proximity to me, my people, or my experience. you figure out ways to enjoy things even as they erase you, or render you invisible. when you finally see some face that may vaguely resemble yours, or a story that seems to carry even the tiniest echo, it becomes a big deal. but people who don’t have that experience accuse you of being ‘narrow’, ‘limited to identity politics’, or any number of buzz terms that’s meant to shame marginalized people who challenge the very concrete ways in which we are silenced, erased and dismissed. yes, i do believe we all have a lot to learn from each other. i just don’t think Asian Americans are an asterisk.
angryinthebones:

Depressingly accurate.

angryinthebones:

Depressingly accurate.

(Source: dissociate-disengage)

In the era of neoliberalism, when the ruling elite has hollowed out democracy and ensured that whoever you vote for you get the same, politically inchoate protest movements are bound to flourish. They have crucial strengths: they can change moods, ditch policies and topple governments. But without socially rooted organisation and clear political agendas, they can flare and fizzle, or be vulnerable to hijacking or diversion by more entrenched and powerful forces.

That also goes for revolutions – and is what appears to be happening in Egypt. Many activists regard traditional political parties and movements as redundant in the internet age. But that’s an argument for new forms of political and social organisation. Without it, the elites will keep control – however spectacular the protests.
decolonization
requires
acknowledging.
that your
needs and desires
should
never
come at the expense of anothers
life energy.
it is being honest
that
you have been spoiled
by a machine
that
is not feeding you freedom,
but
feeding
you
the milk of pain.
My favorite definition for bisexuality so far is the one popularized by (the wonderful) bisexual activist Robyn Ochs. Ochs says, “I call myself bisexual because I acknowledge that I have in myself the potential to be attracted—romantically and/or sexually—to people of more than one sex, and/or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree.”

This is by far the broadest and most enabling definition of bisexuality that I’ve found to date. Its strength is in the way it enables anyone who wants to identify as bisexual to do so. (In other words, it reassures people.)

In a world in which bisexuality is usually very narrowly defined, many people who experience bisexual desire, and want to identify as bi, often feel afraid to start (or keep) identifying as such, as they feel as though they “don’t qualify.” The role that an enabling definition for bisexuality can fulfill to counter these feelings of internalized biphobia is invaluable—and I feel that Ochs’s definition does just that. It reassures people that they are “allowed” to identify as bisexual if they wish to do so.
when I, as an Asian American, say something like “i found something can relate to,” that doesn’t mean I’m closed minded, making it all about me, or that i only enjoy things that remind me of myself. on the contrary, being Asian American means i’m so used to everything *not* being about me, *not* reflecting me, that i don’t ever expect to see anything that’s a close proximity to me, my people, or my experience. you figure out ways to enjoy things even as they erase you, or render you invisible. when you finally see some face that may vaguely resemble yours, or a story that seems to carry even the tiniest echo, it becomes a big deal. but people who don’t have that experience accuse you of being ‘narrow’, ‘limited to identity politics’, or any number of buzz terms that’s meant to shame marginalized people who challenge the very concrete ways in which we are silenced, erased and dismissed. yes, i do believe we all have a lot to learn from each other. i just don’t think Asian Americans are an asterisk.
voltafiish:

This is not fucking okay. 
It was Senator Leticia van de Putte who said this quote and you choose a picture of Senator Wendy Davis? 
This isn’t okay.
GLOSSING OVER WOMEN OF COLOUR IS NOT OKAY.
https://twitter.com/TheDemocrats

voltafiish:

This is not fucking okay. 

It was Senator Leticia van de Putte who said this quote and you choose a picture of Senator Wendy Davis? 

This isn’t okay.

GLOSSING OVER WOMEN OF COLOUR IS NOT OKAY.

https://twitter.com/TheDemocrats